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The OAK Law Project

The photo is of the Boston Public Library Bates Hall Reading Room & Clocks, From The Government Documents Office (Boston, MA) by takomabibelot
The photo is of the Boston Public Library Bates Hall Reading Room & Clocks, From The Government Documents Office (Boston, MA) by takomabibelot

In today's ever-changing world, open access to knowledge is an increasingly important driver in enhancing social, cultural and economic development. The QUT based Open Access to Knowledge (OAK) Law Project led by Professor Brian Fitzgerald and funded by the Department of Employment, Science and Training aims to ensure that people can legally and efficiently share knowledge in an open access manner across domains and across the world.

OAKList

One of the key aims of the OAK Law Project, identified in para 5.112 of the OAK Law Project Report No. 1, has been to develop this web-enabled database containing information about publishing agreements and publishers' open access policies - The OAKList. This information is vital to anyone trying to deposit into, create or manage an open access repository in compliance with the law.

This database is accessible to authors, copyright administrators and repository managers, both in Australia and overseas. The OAK List has been developed to be interoperable with the RoMEO/SHERPA database.

OAKList Methodology

The general method used to ascertain publishers' approaches towards open access has been to request and examine publishing agreements, and published statements or policies of the publisher and then to contact them via email or over the phone to confirm details and a common understanding of those documents. After doing this a colour coding or category has been determined in line with SHERPA classification explaining what can be done (by author and repository) in relation to the online archiving of material published by a specific publisher.

The methodology is described in greater detail in the OAK Law Project Report - A Review and Analysis of Academic Publishing Agreements and Open Access Policies (Version 1 - February 2008).